Dukesway Academy

Parent Tips

How to Help Your Child Prepare for Standardized Tests

Standardized tests currently play a major role in the United States public schools. Your child may take one or more standardized tests during the school year, and your child’s teacher may spend class time on test preparation throughout the year. As a parent, there are a number of ways that you can support your child before and after taking a standardized test, as well as a number of ways you can support your child’s learning habits on a daily basis that will help her be more prepared when it’s time to be tested.

While many parents, educators, school leaders, and policymakers disagree about the kinds of tests administered, how the scores should be used, and how frequently students should be tested, it is important to be supportive of your child’s efforts on standardized tests, and to help them do their best. You can also learn more about testing from teachers, parent liaisons, and your local PTA organization to better understand how testing is being carried out at your child’s school, and how the results are being used.

Parents On a Daily Basis

In addition to other strategies, there are a number of ways that you can maximize your child’s learning capabilities throughout the school year, which can lead to confident test-taking. Some of these strategies include:

Assisting your child with homework and ensuring that your child is completing all homework assignments
Helping her to develop good study habits, thinking skills, and a positive attitude towards education from an early age
Ensuring that your child has good attendance at school
Staying in communication with your child’s teacher
Encouraging your child to read as much as possible, and to increase her vocabulary – even reading magazines, newspapers, and comic books regularly will help improve her reading skills
Looking for educational games and programs that engage your child
Helping your child learn how to follow directions carefully (Dietel, 2008; IRA (2002); Narang, 2008).

Finally, remember that standardized tests and grading systems are not perfect; each format has its own limitations. As you help your child(ren) do their very best on the tests they take and in all of their schoolwork, also remind them that testing is just one part of their education. With your support and involvement, they will be well on their way to their own bright future.
References

Dietel, R. Helping Your Child Perform Well on Tests. Retrieved April 2, 2008, from http://www.pta.org/archive_article_details_1117835382718.html.

International Reading Association (IRA). (2002). Prepare your child for reading tests [Brochure]. Bachman, T.M.: Author.

Narang, S. (2008). Standardized tests: What you should know before your child sharpens his #2 pencil. Retrieved April 2, 2008, from http://content.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=1403.

Research – Washington, D.C. – Safe Kids Worldwide is partnering with the National Highway Traffic Safety

Administration (NHTSA), the General Motors Foundation and OnStar for today’s National Heatstroke Prevention Day, a day-long social media campaign to raise awareness about heatstroke and the importance of never leaving a child alone in a car.

So far this year, at least 19 children have died from heatstroke while unattended in vehicles. These tragedies have happened in 11 different states and in temperatures as hot as 96 degrees and as mild as 73 degrees.

To learn safety tips, visit: http://www.safekids.org/heatstroke

“We don’t want to see this tragedy happen to any family,” said Kate Carr, president and CEO of Safe Kids Worldwide. “We’re asking everyone to help protect kids from this very preventable tragedy by spreading the word on National Heatstroke Prevention Day. Whether you’re a parent, caregiver or a concerned bystander, you can help save lives.”

As part of National Heatstroke Prevention Day, Safe Kids and the General Motors Foundation are posting heatstroke messaging, statistics and prevention tips on Facebook and Twitter between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. to help raise awareness about heatstroke prevention.

In addition, starting July 31, OnStar advisors will be reminding subscribers to “never leave a child alone in a car” when traveling with young children and also encouraging subscribers to be a Good Samaritan and press the red emergency button in their vehicle if they see an unattended young child locked in a parked vehicle.

“As long-time partners of Safe Kids, General Motors and the General Motors Foundation are committed to keeping kids safe in and around vehicles,” said General Motors Foundation President Vivian Pickard. “Our goal is to help educate families, caregivers and bystanders to ensure that we don’t lose another child to heatstroke.”

Many people are shocked to learn how hot the inside of a car can actually get. On an 80 degree day, the temperature inside of a car can rise 19 degrees in as little as 10 minutes and keep getting hotter with each passing minute. And cracking the window doesn’t help.

Heatstroke sets in when the body isn’t able to cool itself quickly enough. A child’s body heats up three to five times faster than adult’s, making them more susceptible to heatstroke. When a child’s internal temperature reaches 104 degrees, major organs begin to shut down, and when that temperature reaches 107 degrees, the child can die.

Safe Kids supports NHTSA’s heatstroke education campaign, “Where’s Baby? Look Before You Lock.” In addition, to help prevent these tragedies, Safe Kids, with the support of the General Motors Foundation, created Never Leave Your Child Alone in a Car as part of its Buckle Up program, a national initiative established 17 years ago to keep children and families safe in and around cars.

Parents, caregivers and bystanders are encouraged to help reduce the number of heatstroke deaths by remembering to ACT.

A: Avoid heatstroke-related injury and death by never leaving your child alone in a car, not even for a minute. And make sure to keep your car locked when you’re not in it so kids don’t get in on their own.
C: Create reminders by putting something in the back of your car next to your child such as a briefcase, a purse or a cell phone that is needed at your final destination. This is especially important if you’re not following your normal routine.
T: Take action. If you see a child alone in a car, call 911. Emergency personnel want you to call. They are trained to respond to these situations. One call could save a life.
For more information on preventing child heatstroke deaths, please visit www.safekids.org/heatstroke.

 

 

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